YÖKDİL Fen Bilimleri Testleri – Okuma Parçası 3

YÖKDİL Fen Bilimleri Testleri - Okuma Parçası 3

Tebrikler - YÖKDİL Fen Bilimleri Testleri - Okuma Parçası 3 adlı sınavı başarıyla tamamladınız. Sizin aldığınız skor %%SCORE%% en yüksek skor %%TOTAL%%. Hakkınızdaki düşüncemiz %%RATING%%
Yanıtlarınız aşağıdaki gibidir.
Soru 1

Noise drives many species of marine animals to change their behaviour markedly – their calling, feeding and migration patterns – sometimes onto a beach and ending their lives. Fish like cod and haddock in the Barents Sea have been found to escape from the area when oil-prospecting air guns start firing, drastically reducing fish catches for days. Large baleen whales communicate over vast distances in the same frequencies that ship propellers and engines generate. On most days, the area over which whales in coastal waters can hear one another shrinks to only 10 to 20 per cent of its natural extent. Christopher W. Clark studies endangered northern right whales, whose habitat includes busy shipping lanes for the port of Boston. “Shipping noise is always there,” Clark says. “It doesn’t have to be fatal to be problematic over time. The whales’ social network is constantly being ripped and reformed.” Unable to communicate, individual whales have trouble finding each other and spend more time on their own. The problem is getting steadily worse for another reason. As we are making more noise, we are also making the ocean better at transmitting it. Seawater is absorbing less sound as carbon dioxide from fossil-fuel burning seeps into the ocean and acidifies it.

It is clearly stated in the passage that the communication of large baleen whales ----

A
is puzzling to researchers because of its wide array of unusual frequencies
B
has disrupted certain human activities, such as marine transportation and fishing
C
has generated a new field of study focusing on how whale noises affect surrounding sea life
D
uses sound frequencies that are the same as those created by aquatic machinery
E
is much slower than other animal interaction due to sound waves having to move through water
Soru 2

Noise drives many species of marine animals to change their behaviour markedly – their calling, feeding and migration patterns – sometimes onto a beach and ending their lives. Fish like cod and haddock in the Barents Sea have been found to escape from the area when oil-prospecting air guns start firing, drastically reducing fish catches for days. Large baleen whales communicate over vast distances in the same frequencies that ship propellers and engines generate. On most days, the area over which whales in coastal waters can hear one another shrinks to only 10 to 20 per cent of its natural extent. Christopher W. Clark studies endangered northern right whales, whose habitat includes busy shipping lanes for the port of Boston. “Shipping noise is always there,” Clark says. “It doesn’t have to be fatal to be problematic over time. The whales’ social network is constantly being ripped and reformed.” Unable to communicate, individual whales have trouble finding each other and spend more time on their own. The problem is getting steadily worse for another reason. As we are making more noise, we are also making the ocean better at transmitting it. Seawater is absorbing less sound as carbon dioxide from fossil-fuel burning seeps into the ocean and acidifies it.

According to the passage, the concern of Christopher W. Clark is that ----.

A
the northern right whale is now only able to use 10 to 20 per cent of its repertoire of communication signals
B
noise from human shipping activities disrupts northern right whales’ social network to the detriment of their overall well-being
C
unless the illegal hunting of whales is halted immediately, their numbers will decrease dramatically
D
the northern right whales may become engaged in a deadly competition for territory against fish like cod and haddock
E
it will become necessary to relocate the northern right whales to a more hospitable, less trafficked area
Soru 3

Noise drives many species of marine animals to change their behaviour markedly – their calling, feeding and migration patterns – sometimes onto a beach and ending their lives. Fish like cod and haddock in the Barents Sea have been found to escape from the area when oil-prospecting air guns start firing, drastically reducing fish catches for days. Large baleen whales communicate over vast distances in the same frequencies that ship propellers and engines generate. On most days, the area over which whales in coastal waters can hear one another shrinks to only 10 to 20 per cent of its natural extent. Christopher W. Clark studies endangered northern right whales, whose habitat includes busy shipping lanes for the port of Boston. “Shipping noise is always there,” Clark says. “It doesn’t have to be fatal to be problematic over time. The whales’ social network is constantly being ripped and reformed.” Unable to communicate, individual whales have trouble finding each other and spend more time on their own. The problem is getting steadily worse for another reason. As we are making more noise, we are also making the ocean better at transmitting it. Seawater is absorbing less sound as carbon dioxide from fossil-fuel burning seeps into the ocean and acidifies it.

We can infer from the passage that disruptions to marine animals’ communication ----.

A
can confuse them to such a degree that they engage in self-destructive behaviour
B
creates problems for fishermen who hope to increase their activities
C
results in the inability to pass on communicative behaviour to whale offspring
D
may cause the whale to behave more aggressively towards other sea creatures
E
casts doubt on previous research done on whales’ social networks
Soru 4

Noise drives many species of marine animals to change their behaviour markedly – their calling, feeding and migration patterns – sometimes onto a beach and ending their lives. Fish like cod and haddock in the Barents Sea have been found to escape from the area when oil-prospecting air guns start firing, drastically reducing fish catches for days. Large baleen whales communicate over vast distances in the same frequencies that ship propellers and engines generate. On most days, the area over which whales in coastal waters can hear one another shrinks to only 10 to 20 per cent of its natural extent. Christopher W. Clark studies endangered northern right whales, whose habitat includes busy shipping lanes for the port of Boston. “Shipping noise is always there,” Clark says. “It doesn’t have to be fatal to be problematic over time. The whales’ social network is constantly being ripped and reformed.” Unable to communicate, individual whales have trouble finding each other and spend more time on their own. The problem is getting steadily worse for another reason. As we are making more noise, we are also making the ocean better at transmitting it. Seawater is absorbing less sound as carbon dioxide from fossil-fuel burning seeps into the ocean and acidifies it.

It is understood from the passage that the problem of aquatic noise pollution is compounded by ----.

A
a reduction in the birth rate of whales due to changes in mating behaviour
B
variations in whale migration patterns due to global warming
C
whales’ inability to establish new social connections once old ones have been broken
D
changes to the composition of sea water
E
leaks and spills from underwater drilling for oil and the resulting destruction of marine habitats
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