Yökdil Sosyal Bilimleri 2018 Çıkmış Sorular Çöz (Part 6) – Yökdil Anlam Bütünlüğü Soruları Çöz

Yökdil Sosyal Bilimleri 2018 Çıkmış Sorular Çöz (Part 6) - Yökdil Anlam Bütünlüğü Soruları Çöz

Tebrikler - Yökdil Sosyal Bilimleri 2018 Çıkmış Sorular Çöz (Part 6) - Yökdil Anlam Bütünlüğü Soruları Çöz adlı sınavı başarıyla tamamladınız. Sizin aldığınız skor %%SCORE%% en yüksek skor %%TOTAL%%. Hakkınızdaki düşüncemiz %%RATING%%
Yanıtlarınız aşağıdaki gibidir.
Soru 1

Between 1950 and 2000, the world population increased from about 2.5 billion to over 6 billion people. Throughout this era, food shortages and malnutrition persisted in parts of eastern and southern Asia, Central and South America, and throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Famines were caused by human factors such as war, civil strife, and failed economic and political policies, while sometimes being exacerbated by natural disasters such as drought. -------. Hundreds of thousands of others left their homes, walking long distances to neighbouring countries in search of food. These refugees then became dependent on subsistence aid from governments or relief agencies.

A
Improved transportation and communication systems allowed food to be distributed in poor regions
B
In the early twenty-first century, a peanut-based paste offered high nutritional value at very low cost
C
In the 1970s an almost decade-long drought in the Sahel region of Africa south of the Sahara contributed to the death of millions
D
The change in developed countries’ agricultural policies in the 1980s increased agricultural production by 50 percent
E
Technological and political developments led to the increase in food production and distribution in many regions
Soru 2

The term ‘archaeology’ comes from the Greek word arkhaiologia , which means “discourse about ancient things”. Yet, it has come to mean the study of the human past through surviving material traces. The term ‘human’ past needs stressing, because archaeologists do not – contrary to what many of us believe – study dinosaurs, or rocks. --------. Archaeologists cannot possibly study dinosaurs, because they had been extinct for tens of millions of years by the time the first humans evolved

A
Palaeontologists know precisely why and how dinosaurs became extinct
B
That is to say, archaeology and geology have certain theoretical similarities
C
Those are the realm of palaeontologists and geologists, not of archaeologists
D
Similarly, a geologist studies the physical structure and substance of the earth
E
Dinosaur bones should be studied by archaeologists and palaeontologists together
Soru 3

Global urbanisation is one of the biggest social transformations in human history. With more than half of the world’s population already living in cities, and 90 percent of population growth by 2050 projected to be added to them, cities are at the forefront of the battle for sustainability. They pose major challenges for city planners and policymakers, such as land use, resource demand, and air and water pollution. This being so, however, it is expected that more urban areas will be built in the next 30 years than ever before. -------. If cities continue to expand at this rate, the projected urbanisation alone will exceed the limit set by the 2015 Paris climate agreement.

A
Even though Australia is already a highly urbanised country, it is still experiencing rapid urban expansion
B
As a result, there has been an increase in the rate of agricultural production
C
Cities already account for about 75 percent of global energy use and contribute an equivalent share of greenhouse gas emissions
D
Only a much closer collaboration between scientists and urban policymakers can lead to a more efficient transportation system
E
Cities are complex, adaptive and evolving systems that interact and influence each other in complex ways
Soru 4

(I) The connection between philosophy and literature is acknowledged by many recent scholars. (II) Most ancient philosophers see their task as being, in general, that of understanding the world, a task which includes understanding ourselves. (III) In this respect, Aristotle has indicated that all humans by nature desire ‘to understand’. (IV) What is meant is not a piling-up of known facts, but rather the achievement of understanding. (V) This is something that we do when we master a field or body of knowledge and explain systematically why things are the way they are

A
III
B
I
C
IV
D
II
E
V
Soru 5

(I) Reading, unlike speaking and understanding, must be deliberately taught. (II) Three methods of teaching reading have been used in the United States: whole-word, whole-language , and phonics . (III) In the whole-word and whole-language approaches, children are taught to recognize entire words without regard to individual letters and sounds. (IV) The phonics approach emphasizes the spelling-sound correspondences of the language, and thus draws on the child’s innate phonological knowledge. (V) However, students of all ages must learn content material such as maths and science

A
I
B
II
C
III
D
V
E
IV
Soru 6

(I) As mass culture became steadily more spectacular and immersive – with larger high-definition TV sets and vast cinema screens, with the enclosed and carefully calculated spectacle of the shopping centre or theme park – art had to compete. (II) Art could do so by feeding off the allure of mass culture while adding its own aesthetic and estranged edge. (III) It could reverse the norms of mass culture, providing impressive, non-functional objects and environments that, unlike those of the mall or resort, were not geared to selling. (IV) Both of whom have recently had shows in New York’s most important art museums. (V) Lastly, art could compete with mass culture by making representations of a scale, richness of colour, and definition unknown in the mass media.

A
IV
B
II
C
III
D
I
E
V
Soru 7

(I) Built in 1961, the Berlin Wall quickly became the most vivid symbol of the Cold War. (II) The agreement in question came to an end with the breakup of the Soviet Union. (III) The 28 miles of wall with barbed wire and minefields separated the Soviet-controlled East Berlin from the U.S. supported West Berlin. (IV) Passage across the border between East and West Berlin was heavily restricted. (V) Families were divided after its establishment, and some East Berliners were no longer able to commute to work.

A
IV
B
I
C
II
D
III
E
V
Soru 8

Images on coins are not chosen randomly. They function as emblems of the country that mints them. The Greek word “Europe” is the name of a mythical figure, and also defines the geographical and political entity Europe. The double meaning is not coincidental. The fortunes of the mythical figure and the region have been intimately connected from antiquity, though the precise nature of their relationship was complex and contested. The coin suggests a clever play on the word ‘Europa’. It uses the mythical “Europa” to symbolize modern Europe. In doing so, it makes a powerful statement about national (and international) identities and about modern Europe´s cultural origins. The Euro was introduced in 2002 to mark a new world order: the creation of a new Europe or the European Union. At this moment of great change, the coin provides the reassurance of continuity; new Europe is also old Europe, with a long and venerable tradition that goes back to ancient Greece. Thus, the repetition of the symbol promotes the European Union

According to the text, the word 'Europa'  -------.

A
gained significance only after the creation of the European Union
B
used to be the name of a region in Europe
C
bears no relation to the political entity of Europe
D
defines a long forgotten mythological  figure
E
is used as an indication of the cultural origin of European states
Soru 9

Images on coins are not chosen randomly. They function as emblems of the country that mints them. The Greek word “Europe” is the name of a mythical figure, and also defines the geographical and political entity Europe. The double meaning is not coincidental. The fortunes of the mythical figure and the region have been intimately connected from antiquity, though the precise nature of their relationship was complex and contested. The coin suggests a clever play on the word ‘Europa’. It uses the mythical “Europa” to symbolize modern Europe. In doing so, it makes a powerful statement about national (and international) identities and about modern Europe´s cultural origins. The Euro was introduced in 2002 to mark a new world order: the creation of a new Europe or the European Union. At this moment of great change, the coin provides the reassurance of continuity; new Europe is also old Europe, with a long and venerable tradition that goes back to ancient Greece. Thus, the repetition of the symbol promotes the European Union

We understand from the text that the symbol of Europa on European coins --------.

A
promotes faith in continuity and unification at a time of significant change
B
was used simply for decorative purposes
C
meant different things for different nations in the world
D
is still under debate because of its political implications
E
was not approved by European people for a long time
Soru 10

Images on coins are not chosen randomly. They function as emblems of the country that mints them. The Greek word “Europe” is the name of a mythical figure, and also defines the geographical and political entity Europe. The double meaning is not coincidental. The fortunes of the mythical figure and the region have been intimately connected from antiquity, though the precise nature of their relationship was complex and contested. The coin suggests a clever play on the word ‘Europa’. It uses the mythical “Europa” to symbolize modern Europe. In doing so, it makes a powerful statement about national (and international) identities and about modern Europe´s cultural origins. The Euro was introduced in 2002 to mark a new world order: the creation of a new Europe or the European Union. At this moment of great change, the coin provides the reassurance of continuity; new Europe is also old Europe, with a long and venerable tradition that goes back to ancient Greece. Thus, the repetition of the symbol promotes the European Union

According to the text, images used on coins -------.

A
must have been of little importance from antiquity to modern times
B
can be copied and used by various powerful states across the globe
C
do not have much significance and can be easily changed by governments
D
can be powerful instruments to affirm the political and cultural integrity of countries
E
show the significance of economic and industrial development in a country
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