YÖKDİL Sosyal Bilimler Testleri 2

YÖKDİL Sosyal Testleri 2

Tebrikler - YÖKDİL Sosyal Testleri 2 adlı sınavı başarıyla tamamladınız. Sizin aldığınız skor %%SCORE%% en yüksek skor %%TOTAL%%. Hakkınızdaki düşüncemiz %%RATING%%
Yanıtlarınız aşağıdaki gibidir.
Soru 1

The term bureaucracy ---- the various departments and agencies of the executive branch that help the president carry out his or her duties.

A
results in
B
puts off
C
refers to
D
turns down
E
takes up
Soru 2

Contrary ---- common belief, jogging is not completely harmless to people ---- 65.

A
from / of
B
of / from
C
out of / to
D
at / in
E
to / over
Soru 3

Most Americans ---- their information about government from the news media because it ---- impossible to gather all the news themselves.

A
get / is
B
got / would have been
C
had got / will be
D
were getting / has been
E
are getting / was
Soru 4

---- culture often has a strong effect on behaviour, scholars rely on anthropological studies and methods to draw conclusions.

A
Whereas
B
As soon as
C
Unless
D
Because
E
Only if
Soru 5

Many Asian cultures, ---- those of individualistic western countries, promote a view of the self as interdependent.

A
despite
B
except for
C
for all
D
unlike
E
thanks to
Soru 6

Although Queen Victoria's reign was a time of great material prosperity and economic growth, ----.

A
women would have been granted the right to vote in the twentieth century
B
the 1876 and 1884 Reform Bills achieved further democratization of British politics
C
the Queen herself believed strongly in the importance of these ideas
D
industrialization and urbanization brought huge social difficulties
E
the middle classes in Britain were gradually getting richer
Soru 7

Microcredit was introduced in 1976 in Bangladesh ----.

A
so virtually all the wealthy people in the region applied for huge loans
B
just as those investments in large businesses are necessary there
C
as investors establish several banks for this purpose alone
D
where its government tried to alleviate poverty and improve the lives of the poor
E
while the minorities in the country mostly speak local languages
Soru 8

Considerable additions need to be made in its content so that your book can be published

A
İçeriğinde yapılması gereken büyük değişikliklerden ötürü, kitabın basılamıyor
B
İçeriğinde büyük değişiklikler yap ki kitabın basılabilsin
C
Kitabının basılabilmesi, içeriğinde büyük değişiklikler yapılmasını gerektirmekte.
D
Kitabının basılabilmesi için içeriğinde büyük eklemeler yapılması gerekmekte.
E
İçeriğinde büyük değişiklikler yapılması durumunda, kitabın gelecekte basılabilir
Soru 9

Though we think that our hands are clean after we wash them, there may be thousands of tiny organisms called “bacteria” on them.

A
Ellerimizi yıkadığımızda tamamen temizlendiklerini düşünüyoruz, ancak üzerlerinde “bakteri” denen binlerce küçük organizma yaşamaya devam ediyor
B
Ellerimizi yıkadığımızda temizlendiklerini düşünebiliriz, ancak “bakteri” adı verilen binlerce küçük organizma hala yaşamaya devam ediyor.
C
Ellerimizin yıkadıktan sonra temiz olduğunu sanıyoruz, ancak üzerlerinde “bakteri” denen binlerce küçük organizmanın yaşadığını bilmiyoruz.
D
Ellerimizi yıkadıktan sonra temiz olduklarını düşünsek de üzerlerinde “bakteri” denen binlerce küçük organizma olabilir
E
Ellerimizi yıkasak bile “bakteri” denen küçük organizmaların binlercesi yaşamaya devam ediyor olabilir
Soru 10

More than any other item in history, smart phones have made journalism so commonplace.

A
Akıllı telefonlar, tarihte diğer başka herhangi bir üründen daha fazla, gazeteciliği böylesine yaygın hale getirmiştir
B
Tarihteki diğer ürünlerin yanı sıra gazeteciliği bu kadar yaygın hale getiren akıllı telefonlardır
C
Gazetecilikte akıllı telefon kullanımı öyle yaygınlaştı ki tarihteki başka bir üründen daha fazla telefon yapılmaktadır
D
Akıllı telefonlar gazetecilikte tarihteki diğer herhangi bir ürün kadar kullanılmaktadır
E
Tarihte akıllı telefonların gazeteciliğin yaygınlaşmasına yaptığı katkının fazlasını diğer ürünler sağladı
Soru 11

Rüzgar o kadar sert esiyordu ki nereye gittiğimizi bile göremiyorduk.

A
We were unable to see even where we were going because the wind began to blow really fast.
B
We couldn’t see where we were going because the wind was blowing much faster than usual.
C
The wind was blowing so hard that we weren’t even able to see where we were going.
D
Such was the force of the wind that we couldn’t see our way.
E
The strong wind prevented us from seeing where we were going
Soru 12

Bakanlık hayvancılığı desteklemediği takdirde, ciddi bir et sıkıntısının olması kaçınılmazdır.

A
Although the Ministry has decided to subsidize cattle farming, a meat shortage cannot be avoided
B
A shortage of meat will inevitably force the Ministry to subsidize cattle farming.
C
Unless the Ministry subsidizes cattle farming, a serious meat shortage is inevitable
D
But for the Ministry’s decision to subsidize cattle farming,the demand for meat cannot be met.
E
The cattle farming subsidies decided on by the Ministry have not tackled the meat shortage
Soru 13

Music may truly be a universal language. When listening to the same piece, different listeners show very similar patterns of brain activity, a new study of brain scans suggests. Untrained listeners in the study responded very similarly to a 10-minute symphony, and the similarities cropped up not only in brain areas linked with sound processing, but also in regions responsible for attention, memory and movement planning. "The findings may help explain why music is such a powerful group experience" so concluded the researchers. "Evolutionarily, music is something people came together to do. People chanted when they worked together. It was to bring us together for rituals, and to some degree, that still happens when we go to concerts or a club. The research triggered an intriguing question: Is music a universal language? If so, to what extent? Some people may rock out to Metallica, while others prefer Gencebay, but at least a few elements of the listening experience seem to be universal. For instance, studies have found that happiness, anger and other basic emotions are expressed similarly in music across cultures. The preliminary findings are yet to prove that music is an universal language, but it elicited enough proof to claim that it ignites similar behavior, irrespective of ethnicity.

  •  It is stated in the passage that -----.
A
there is logic in suspecting that music could be common language
B
research subjects were experienced and trained in music
C
no matter what sort of music is played, it triggers same emotions on all humans
D
the evolution of music cannot be differentiated from that of the humans
E
music is a bond that binds all the cultures in the same way
Soru 14
 

Music may truly be a universal language. When listening to the same piece, different listeners show very similar patterns of brain activity, a new study of brain scans suggests. Untrained listeners in the study responded very similarly to a 10-minute symphony, and the similarities cropped up not only in brain areas linked with sound processing, but also in regions responsible for attention, memory and movement planning. "The findings may help explain why music is such a powerful group experience" so concluded the researchers. "Evolutionarily, music is something people came together to do. People chanted when they worked together. It was to bring us together for rituals, and to some degree, that still happens when we go to concerts or a club. The research triggered an intriguing question: Is music a universal language? If so, to what extent? Some people may rock out to Metallica, while others prefer Gencebay, but at least a few elements of the listening experience seem to be universal. For instance, studies have found that happiness, anger and other basic emotions are expressed similarly in music across cultures. The preliminary findings are yet to prove that music is an universal language, but it elicited enough proof to claim that it ignites similar behavior, irrespective of ethnicity.

  • The writer -----.
A
does not approve of the way that the research is carried out
B
reckons that music hardly ever triggers resembling emotions on strangers
C
regards the finding of the research exciting, but inconclusive
D
sounds absolutely convinced that music is a universal language
E
advises other researchers to replicate the study with professionals musicians
Soru 15
 

Music may truly be a universal language. When listening to the same piece, different listeners show very similar patterns of brain activity, a new study of brain scans suggests. Untrained listeners in the study responded very similarly to a 10-minute symphony, and the similarities cropped up not only in brain areas linked with sound processing, but also in regions responsible for attention, memory and movement planning. "The findings may help explain why music is such a powerful group experience" so concluded the researchers. "Evolutionarily, music is something people came together to do. People chanted when they worked together. It was to bring us together for rituals, and to some degree, that still happens when we go to concerts or a club. The research triggered an intriguing question: Is music a universal language? If so, to what extent? Some people may rock out to Metallica, while others prefer Gencebay, but at least a few elements of the listening experience seem to be universal. For instance, studies have found that happiness, anger and other basic emotions are expressed similarly in music across cultures. The preliminary findings are yet to prove that music is an universal language, but it elicited enough proof to claim that it ignites similar behavior, irrespective of ethnicity.

  • It is stated in the passage that -----.
A
just as all languages serve the same purpose, so does music
B
whatever the genre is and whoever the listener is, music will be played the same
C
brain activities of the test subjects hardly demonstrated any significance
D
whether it is Metallica or Gencebay, most components of the listening experience are identical
E
music has been a medium that binds people and gathers them in the same place
Soru 16

The High Court in Kenya has blocked the Kenyan government's attempt to close the largest refugee camp in the world. The camp, called The Dadaab, houses 330,000 Somalian refugees. Kenya's government wanted to close it and send 260,000 Somali refugees back to Somalia. ----.

A
In fact, he said that this would have caused discrimination among the refugees across the world
B
Therefore, it is made up of five giant camps and is run by the United Nations
C
In contrast, these refugees were suffering from epidemic diseases
D
However, the court decided it was wrong to send them back just because of their nationality
E
In addition, they feared that declaring war against Somalia would create another crisis
Soru 17

---- His most famous works are the Foundation Series, the Galactic Empire series and the Robot series. Later, beginning with Foundation's Edge, he linked distant future to the Robot and Spacer stories, creating a unified "future history" for his stories. He wrote hundreds of short stories, including the social science fiction "Nightfall", which in 1964 was voted by the Science Fiction Writers of America the best short science fiction story of all time.

A
Isaac Asimov, like his peers, began reading science fiction magazines at a young age.
B
Only two people whose intellect surpassed that of Asimov did not appreciate the stories he wrote.
C
Isaac Asimov was one of the "Big Three" science fiction writers during his lifetime
D
Isaac Asimov was also a founding member of the Committee for the Scientific Investigation of Claims of the Paranormal
E
The Boston University offered Asimov a position with which he remained associated thereafter
Soru 18

(I) Russian society in the early twentieth century was bipolar. (II) In other words, a tiny minority controlled most of the country’s wealth, while the vast majority of the country’s inhabitants were impoverished and oppressed peasants. (III) Communism arose in Russia when the nation’s workers and peasants rebelled against and overwhelmed the wealthy and powerful class of capitalists and aristocrats. (IV) They also hoped to establish a socialist utopia based on the principles of the German economic and political philosopher Karl Marx. (V) The Communist Manifesto, in contrast, was an impassioned call to action that urged “Workers of the world, unite!”

A
III
B
V
C
IV
D
II
E
I
Soru 19

(I) Pablo Picasso, born in a poor family in southern Spain in 1881, started as a child prodigy and ended as the acknowledged greatest painter of his century. (II) After some early training with his father, a provincial drawing teacher, Picasso showed that he had thoroughly grasped naturalistic conventions at a very young age. (III) After some incomplete sessions of art school, Picasso spent his adolescence associating with the group of Catalan modernists in Barcelona. (IV) But it was the invention of Cubism that secured his immortality. (V) From there he moved to Paris, where his work began to attract serious critical attention and praise by the time he was twenty.

A
III
B
II
C
V
D
IV
E
I
Soru 20

(I) Queen Victoria's reign spanned nearly sixty-four years of British history, 1837 to 1901. (II) As a late nineteenth century phrase expresses, "The sun never set on the British Empire." (III) Those years are remembered as the Victorian Age, which encompassed tremendous changes for Great Britain. (IV) Change occurred in nearly every aspect of British life. (V) By the end of Victoria's reign, for example, political institutions and structures, economic and social conditions, trade, science, and technology all underwent radical changes.

A
III
B
I
C
IV
D
V
E
II
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